Archiving Services

An archive should be a living experience of family history, not dead and hidden away like buried treasure. Still, when people hear the word archive, they usually think of the hidden rooms in a museum that no one can visit, or last scene from "Raiders of the Lost Arc," with a large warehouse and boxes of artifacts, locked up and never to be seen again. Archives don't have to be like that though. With digital technologies, archives can be alive and active, especially at the family level. My job as archivist is not just to scan your photographs, but to make them accessible through archival practices, digitization, colorization, repair, printing, matting, framing and digital archive management. My service is personal, face to face, and is more than just scanning negatives. It is family history and

I have experience with all known forms of photographs and film, including large format film, as well as photographs on metal, glass plates, as well as photographs made from natural sources like leaves and wine. I also have experience working with digital photograph archives and computer cleaning.

From Daguerreotypes to Digital, I've worked with it all. 

For prices Click Here, and for contact, Click Here.

 

Post card photograph of my Great Great Grand Uncle in our kitchen.

Post card photograph of my Great Great Grand Uncle in our kitchen.

Process:

Stage 1: Sorting and Scanning

My process works in Three stages. Stage 1 is where I will visit with you, we will talk about what you want to accomplish with the archiving process. I will look at the state of the archive and address pressing issues. I will take the archive to my studio where I will sort, organize, archive, and do preliminary scans. These scans will be "Facebook Quality" and will serve as a digital portion to the archive. This will allow you to see and sort through the images, which will make sure the archive is visible and help you to make decisions on what to move forward with.

Stage 2: Editing and Printing

In stage 2, you will look through the digital portion of the archive and identify which images are your favorite, most important, or most significant. I will re-scan these photographs at a higher quality, and do a second round of more targeted and discerning edits, including repairs and color corrections. After edits and repairs we can move on to enlarging and printing. I can print straight from your negatives, I can print digital files, and I can clean, dust, flatten, and frame original prints.

(I can also print many images from film and plate negatives in traditional black and white silver gelatin printing . I can print digital images in a large range of sizes up through 16x20." and deliver them framed and matted.)

Stage 3: Long Term Storage and Digital Solutions

Stage 3 looks at what to do now that we have an archive. This includes finding a space to store the physical archive in your home and finding a way to digitally store your archive including hard drives, RAID storage setup, Cloud Storage, and Website building.

 

Examples of Work.

Repair

The advent of digital photo editing, repairs have become much easier. Below is a picture of my Great Great Grand Uncle, an Artist from Hungary. This print is undated, but likely somewhere before the Second World War. You can see the extensive dust, scratches, and general discoloration in the base paper on the original scan. On the right, you can see the edited and repaired version. This image can now be enlarged, printed, and sent to family without fear of damage, while the original can stay safe. Check out the repair page to see a more in depth run through of the repair process.

Image, straight out of scanner, dirty and damaged from age.

Image, straight out of scanner, dirty and damaged from age.

Image after de-dusting and repair.

Image after de-dusting and repair.

Color

On the left, we have an example of an image straight out of the scanner, scanned at what I would call "Facebook Quality." Good, and you can definately see who is there, and what's going on. But not perfect. For special or more meaningful photographs, I go the extra mile and scan them at a higher quality, and edit the colors to be more true to life. That extra step really makes a big difference.

Image, straight out of the scanner: "Facebook Ready" 

Image, straight out of the scanner: "Facebook Ready" 

Image after secondary processing and color correction

Image after secondary processing and color correction